The library in 5 years. 

In October 2013, I wrote:

Ideally in 5 years, our library will become less of a traditional library and evolve towards an information hub, providing a greater breadth of resources in electronic formats, accessible from around the world via internet access. Our library, like many others, is electronic preferred and we will see physical stacks condense as patron driven acquisitions drive up electronic purchases.  

Instead of physical books, students will check out tablets with subscriptions to core collections of
electronic books loaded on them. The condensing of these stacks will open up spaces for collaboration and technology labs. We will see more “pings” from internet connections. The librarian’s role will shift to internet communication and virtual reference, allowing patrons to “call” in for help.  

Along with the shift in resource format, top priorities of the library will include library management
focusing primarily on funding for special projects and less focus on physical collection building. We will
also see more focus on providing adequate internet access, technology devices and electronic resources. 

As the library space and resources transform we will see departments unite in a way they have never done before; engineering students will create programs that medical and biology students will use for lab research.  

Our library will be evolving towards acting as an information hub and a space for collaboration, I envision our library working like a shoelace, securing the core pieces of one entity by providing the final knot of support and unity the campus will thrive from; encouraging innovation and multi-disciplinary collaboration. 

We have a little over a year left; how are we doing? 

An Open Letter to the #c4l16 Program Committee

Thank you.

As I’ve begun the processing period of what a Code4Lib conference does to you, there has been but one thing that has remained the same, working with you all has been one of my best conference experiences. All the hours spent in analyzing proposals, drafting up many many potential programs setups, it was worth it.

Thank you for the support and willingness to try something new. I’ve been on a few conference committees and none of them, have made it feel like we could try something new, until now. Ideas were not shot down, they were taken into consideration. As an outsider looking in, this is a place where if I’m going to put in large quantities of energy, it would not be wasted. I’d willingly do it again.

Thank you for providing a space where I felt less intimidated to say something. For a space where, if I did decide to say something, you were listening to understand and not to respond. As someone who felt like they didn’t belong at Code4Lib — you’ve helped me find my place.

We tried something new, we did not fail, and in fact in my eyes we succeeded. The program was strong and broad reaching. This was something we wanted to happen and worried (given our excitement when the panel came together) that maybe we were overreaching, but what matters most is that we were given the power to try – that says something about the Code4Lib community in general. Thank you to those who helped in paving the pathway so we could do this.

I want to apologize for my falling short on delivering the lightning talk we all envisioned, but thank you for making it an opportunity to be delivered. For standing behind me, in person and by live stream, so I wasn’t up there alone. Thank you for the constant encouragement.

It’s been an honor to be a part of this but most importantly, it’s been a pleasure. Hard work is less hard when you’re on a supportive team and a team that carries the burden together. Because of my experience working with you all this year, you’ve secured my buy in to Code4Lib, for this I am grateful. Thank you for restoring my faith that we can actually be the change we want to see in an organization.

Sincerely,
Me, a very lucky volunteer.

PS Thank you Ben for the extra nudge to join the committee & for putting my name on the list and for your constant encouragement to speak up.

LITA Forum, 2014: My Recap

Last week (Nov. 4-8, 2014)  I attended the LITA (Library and Information Technology Association) Forum in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This was my first LITA anything that I had been a part of and had no expectations beyond those of myself in networking and learning. There were so many fantastic sessions to choose from it was really difficult to choose and thanks to the incredible use of Twitter, I was able to get snips of what was going on in the sessions I couldn’t attend.

I was volunteering with the 2014 planning committee to help out at the conference and showed up a day early to help with the pre-conference sessions. Can I recommend that if you go to a conference, volunteer. Especially if this is your first time at said conference. It open the doors to a lot of opportunity for me and I was able to meet and do many things I would not have if I wasn’t volunteering. Showing up early turned out to be in my benefit because there wasn’t much for me to do besides monitoring the pre-conference sessions so I took advantage of the time to visit of some local attractions in Old Town Albuquerque, specifically the Natural History Museum of New Mexico.

Having some down time prior to the conference was wonderful and I highly recommend to designate downtime either before or after the conference. My reasoning for this is that the conference becomes more than just sessions and lots of people learning/speaking about for the most part very similar topics. It gives you an opportunity to experience life outside of the conference venue, in this case the hotel.

I used Twitter for a substantial amount of note taking for multiple reasons: Sharing session snips with those who couldn’t make it and so that I could refer to it later easily. I have put any embedded tweets in [ ] as I refer to them throughout my recap.

**My recap includes only a few of the sessions I attended. As I gather my thoughts on the rest of them I will add them in along with more resources.**

Feel free to read them here: 

My primary focus going into the conference was to attend as many sessions on institutional repositories (IRs) that I could, learn how they are being used and what other libraries are using. My current place of employment is actively researching IRs as we are on the cusp of moving from our current option, ContentDM, to something that will better suit our needs. Choosing an IR has become increasingly more challenging as OpenAccess and data, where’s our data & what does it say, are major factors in what you need to and want to accomplish with your IR. How it is used, presented, accessed and managed can change what software you go with.

Goal: Learn what others are doing with their IRs.

Achieved: Margaret Heller’s session on “What Does Your Repository Do?: Understanding and Calculating Impact” showed me how Loyola University Chicago’s IR is being used. [PDF]

Margaret’s presentation was super interesting as it took Loyola’s IR and showed how it was being used. The content in the IR is accessible all over the world and when Loyola looked at the data of their IR it showed countries that they never would have thought would have interest or be accessing the content.

The story of why: limited access to resources at their library/institution or lack of resources on that specific topic.

MH_LITA

Having the story beyond the numbers really stuck with me; if done right an IR can serve people you never thought would be accessing your content. [Are the traffic drivers of IRs aligning with the institution’s goal/mission? #litaforum Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

This session more or less reconfirmed the importance of having and IR and the OpenAccess movement.

Resources Gained:

Real-Time readership map from LUC: http://ecommons.luc.edu/readership_map.html#content

Goal: Learn/Discuss an IR in action and resources used.

Achieved: Tommy Keswick’s session on “Using Islandora for Digital Content Delivery” discussed and showed Detroit Public Library using Islandora . [Check out an #Islandora repo from Detroit Public Library. http://t.co/oYgI4up5nF #LITAforum Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

Tommy and I had talked about Islandora a couple of months back at a meet-up in L.A.; prior to my move to New York and prior to my immediate interest in implementing an IR. Islandora is on MPOW’s list of IRs to look at, primary reason our entire site is on Drupal. Islandora is a Drupal, Fedora & Solr developed DAMS (Digital Asset Management System). Why use a DAMS and not just a CMS? A DAMS like Islandora offers standards for metadata, integrity tools and extensibility. A major drawback I have with many IRs is the presentation of the content is never “sock blowing” awesome. No, Islandora isn’t sock blowing but it is definitely a major step closer.

Resources Gained:

Git Repo for Entity Bridge [Cherry Hill devs figured out a way to utilize the flag ability from Drupal with Islandora, Entity Bridge :https://t.co/xGsJejbFpz #litaforum — Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

Solution for Indexing [A solution for tricky indexing create a catch all field(s). Use them to search whole words & to search partial words. #islandora #litaforum — Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

Git Repo for JQuery Zoom [View GitHub repo for JQuery Zoom https://t.co/rwkKHq2Yln #islandora #litaforum — Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

Goal: Be inspired. Achieved: Keynote sessions #1 and #2 (I missed #3 due to flight conflict).

AnnMarie Thomas: Playing to Learn: A Maker’s Perspective. Obviously, her entire keynote was about being a maker. It was by far my favorite point of the entire conference. “It doesn’t feel like work if you’re laughing” so often we get stuck in the “work no play” aspect that we forego opportunities to learn. Her keynote session resonated with me. As a newly dubbed librarian over two departments that are recovering from a stressful reorganization, this session gave me the humph to encourage play at work.

[After being inspired by @amptMN keynote at #litaforum I put out a puzzle this AM & my dept enjoyed the fun. #MAKERS pic.twitter.com/kxb4ludDm4 Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 11, 2014]

Lorcan Dempsey: VP at OCLC. He spoke about Thinking about Technology Differently. “The network reshapes the society and the society reshapes the network.”

 

infovsknowledge by the GapingVoid

We have a lot of text. A lot of records and what we want to do with it is turn it into a form that is more usable. That will yield more insight, more knowledge.

 

We want to make a qualitative difference with the quantity of data/information that we have. I enjoyed this keynote because working in libraries and in library systems, surrounded by information and technology. How I think about it and know it’s use and how it ties together is not how someone else may think about it. Lorcan boldly said, and I agree, “Technology is integrated. It isn’t something you pick up and move over. It is implied and incorporated.”

We have moved from caring just about the outcome to caring significantly about the method. We want to know the how not just the what. Libraries are working constantly with learning behaviors and research behaviors, we see software that has been created to manage the data to tell us more than the what.

You can view the entire keynote session here LITA Forum 2014 Lorcan Dempsey [70min]

Goal: Network and meet others. 

Achieved:

Volunteering: My reasons for volunteering were both monetary benefit and personal networking gain. As I mentioned I had never been to a LITA forum before. I had interacted with a handful of other attendees via Twitter but didn’t know anyone in person. Volunteering gave me a ground to start running. I recorded keynote sessions (gave me a front row seat, WIN!), introduced conference sessions and worked with the planning committee and met up and coming committee members.

Game Night: Cards Against Humanities! [You’re missing out. Come join us! #LITAforum pic.twitter.com/EiadiwR4JB Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

OpenRefine Skill-share: The last night of the conference there were networking dinners to sign up for. A couple of us had tweeted interest in playing around with OpenRefine so instead of doing a networking dinner; I took the initiative to do a sign up for playing with OpenRefine. We ended up with a decent response and had some fun. [@cm_harlow @ranti @lorcanD Say what?!  pic.twitter.com/cK5gyif7DM Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

Unfortunately most of our time, due to dodgy wi-fi, was spent getting installs completed. However, most if not all of those who came left with a bit more knowledge of the program than before and we opened a door of possibility for those who hadn’t any clue as to what OpenRefine could do. [and we’re almost up and running. Installs on multiple OS’s takes time. #litaforum pic.twitter.com/U8rolMh55H Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 8, 2014]

Overall the conference was great. I learned a lot and was able to come back to MPOW with a stronger knowledge of IRs and a stronger reasoning behind my recommendations.

Things I learned for next year, always volunteer, have a goal in mind prior to going but be willing to change/adjust that goal as you need, pack snacks, take good notes, and don’t cement yourself to session that does not hold any interest to you.

Other Resources from the Conference:

How unemployment took up all my time

Prior to February of this year I worked full-time as an ILS coordinator at the University of California, Riverside, I went to school full time to get my MLIS with San Jose State University – School of Library and Information Science and I worked part time as a graduate assistant. Between August 2013-Dec 2013 I was a full-time graduate student, full-time employee, part-time employee (20hr/wk) and an intern….yet somehow when I was provided with 40hrs/wk of ‘free’ time, I am busier now than ever. Why?

Because I got involved. I took the moment to grab lunch with friends. I applied myself in every aspect of life (professional development, scholarships, publications, building connections & relationships, exercise, applying to jobs that I wanted to do in places I wanted to live, we eat out less and the laundry is done more often.)

I still go to school full-time (but only really for about 6 more days), I’m now graduated. I work part-time and I train for marathons/half-marathons/5ks. Being unemployed is hard work. I cannot sit around collecting a small paycheck and doing nothing with myself to improve my situation.

I have attended a handful of workshops. When you have the time to look for them you will see that there are local workshops/meet-ups just about every week sometime multiple times a week.

I continue the intensive job search but am fortunate enough to actually have plenty of jobs to apply for.

But most importantly I do not stop learning. I took it to myself to get involved in Treehouse tracks and learn or hone my skills. I started following repos I’m curious about on Github. I freshen up on my language skills (Spanish and American Sign Language) you never know when these can come in handy. I take the time and I work more with committees and groups and volunteer. I got involved and did the things I wanted to do but couldn’t because I didn’t have time.

Unemployment can be stressful, and usually is. However, you can’t change your situation without moving forward. Put your full effort into a job you want. Take the time to reassess your goals (personal and professional) and take a breather and refresh. Spend quality time with family and friends. Have fun, it is good for the mind and the soul.

Conclusion & Affirmation

Conclusion:

We talk fondly now of the reactions we get when we say we are going to school for library science but at one point I was the one stating, “You have to have a master’s degree to be a librarian?!” Now I am on the other side of the conversation justifying and teaching others about the profession and why I have chosen to pursue it as a career. When I decided to go to library school, specifically online library school, I was concerned about what my experience would be because I thrive off of the personal interaction with my professors and was fearful that the virtual environment would impede on the opportunity to create these personal relationships. I think because of my concern of not being able to create personal relationships in an online environment that I took extra effort to create a personal connection with classmates and my professors and I have created connections that I will carry with me the rest of my professional career and even lifetime.

When I first started the MLIS program at SJSU in the Fall of 2011 I had no idea how it would change my life and the relationships I would create. As I spent hours going through course work and reading past discussion posts I realized that the amount of information I have taken from this program is much more than I ever anticipated receiving. This is not to say I thought I would not get much from the program but that I heavily underestimated how incredible this profession is and those who teach it.

It is with endearment that I complete this program, endearment towards my professors who had passion and desire for the profession. What first captured me in libraries was the staff I worked with was so helpful. At first I thought that was just because of the environment and school I was working at but throughout my journey towards my MLIS degree, I can assuredly state that those who work in the library profession are passionate about their field and love to help and share this passion with others. I too have evolved into this and every opportunity I get to teach someone about what it is to be a librarian I take it.

During my stretch in this program I have: served as a peer mentor, completed a virtual internship, worked as a lead assistant on the transition of the LMS, presented workshops and participated as a guest lecture in student orientations. I have also the opportunity to work on multiple group projects, led team projects and complete high caliber projects that I am proud of and have used in job applications. I have enhanced my online presence without losing the personal human touch. I have written papers and proposals that have been used within my professional career to enhance library spaces. I have learned what it is to write professionally for the web, have a steady professional blog, designed multiple websites and published several web-pages. I have honed the process of tutorial creation for a diverse population and been introduced to amazing technology projects and programs. Most importantly I have created relationships with some of the most amazing peers that I otherwise would not have had the opportunity to.

I come out of this program with the ability to create strategic plans complete with literature reviews, SWOT analysis, environmental scans and missions and value statements. I am capable of designing a full-fledged website from scratch incorporating general programming and integrating web 2.0 and 3.0 tools. I have experience working with multiple major library management systems (Desire 2 Learn and Canvas) and content management systems (Drupal, Joomla and WordPress). Along with these skills I have a greater understanding of library management including addressing sensitive situations with care and understanding while still holding true to professional ethics and necessities. My reference services have increased exponentially and I have been introduced to more resources then I will ever know what to do with.

My time at SJSU has been focused on web development and creating a better digital user experience, my plans for further professional growth are focused on the same concepts. Just as my concern that the online environment would hinder the development of personal interaction with professors, I have focused on helping libraries create an experience for the user that would cultivate the personal interaction and cultivate further collaboration with others over information.

It is amazing that this journey has gone by so quickly. It has been the best decision I have made for my professional career and has been highly satisfying. I find myself getting excited thinking about the next step in my professional career and this confirms to me that I am where I need to and want to be, as an information professional.

Affirmation:

I, Whitni Watkins, hereby affirm that:

  1. All introductory, reflective, and evidentiary work submitted is mine alone (except where indicated as a group or team project), and has been prepared solely by me.
  2. I am protecting the privacy of the contents of my e-Portfolio by password protecting it or by sharing the URL only with my e-portfolio advisor.
  3. Before making my e-portfolio public I will respect the privacy of others by removing mention in this e-Portfolio of information that could lead to the identity of individuals (team members in group projects, internship supervisors, interviewees, etc.) and institutions

Introduction to my ePortfolio

Contained in this area of my blog includes my final project for my Masters in Library and Information Science from the School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at San José State University. This project is referred to as an ePortfolio.  The ePortfolio is an electronic presentation of my course work and professional work as they relate to demonstrating understanding and mastery of the core competencies of the program.

The compilation of work showcases the discussion and collection of evidence I have selected to demonstrate and display my knowledge, skills and abilities over the course of my educational career at SLIS. This ePortfolio serves as evidence of what I have learned, accomplished and can accomplish.

I began working on the organization of my course work in the Fall of 2011 where I created folders for each competency and would save copies of course work that was applicable to the corresponding competency folder. This was an instrumental task when it came to my final preparation for creating the ePortfolio. I then spent some time before the start of the Fall 2013 semester rehashing through the course work where I went through each piece of work that was in the competency folders and removed any work that I felt was a “just in case” piece of evidence. Taking this extra step turned out to be a huge relief because I was able to go through each folder and see which competencies I was strong in and which ones I was not. It also allowed me to start writing immediately because I had the evidence selected and organized already.

Having my evidence broken down into competencies allowed me time to trial the multiple options of building my ePortfolio well before I had to start the official process. I built sample ePortfolios in Google Sites, D2L, Weebly and WordPress. In the end I chose to showcase my ePortfolio on my WordPress blog for the following reasons:

  1. Ability to password protect each post
  2. The blog was also used to compile my professional work from:
    1. Virtual Internship
    2. Web Design courses
    3. Peer Mentoring course
    4. Easily exported and imported to other areas and servers
    5. Well known platform that has stability in its existence

This ePortfolio is structured in the following manner and showed be showcased as such: Introduction, Statement of Philosophy, Core Competencies, Conclusion and Affirmation Statement. Each section is organized in the general format including an introduction paragraph, body & evidence, concluding paragraph and references (if any).

The core competencies are presented in a format that was requested by my advisor as well as the manner in which I feel best showcases my understanding and mastery of the competency. Each competency post begins with a verbatim correlating statement from the SLIS webpage of Core Competencies (http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/current-students/courses/core-competencies) of what the competency is about, followed then by a statement produced by me of my understanding of the competency and supported by published material if needed, followed then by the presentation of my evidence and how each piece applies to the competency and ending with a concluding paragraph and references.

The process of creating this project has been an invaluable reflection of what I have accomplished over the past two years through both my educational work as well as my related professional work. It has been a review of my abilities and what I am capable of doing in this field.

Describe and compare the organizational settings in which library and information professionals practice

Component 1: Statement of Competency

At the general level, goal and purpose of librarianship is to understand how to access resources of information and to disseminate that information as needed. Underlining this general statement of librarianship is the diversity of the types of organizations librarians will serve in. There are four main types of library organizations public, academic, school and special. These organizations are tailored to fulfill specific missions and serving specific communities. We can distinguish these organizations from each other by looking at their resources and collection focus, the community they serve, their mission and where their funding comes from.

Public Libraries

There are roughly 17,000 public libraries just within the United States that serve our communities. Rubin states the mission of a public library is, “to meet the education, recreational, informational, and cultural needs of its community” (Rubin, 2010, p173). This mission is very broad and is taxing on the staff and administration of public libraries to fulfill it. Funding for public libraries comes from tax payers or public funds, because of this when there is economic distress public libraries suffer at a greater extent than privately funded libraries because budgets get cut and funding sources decrease.

A public library’s collection serves the largest and most diverse population of the library organizations. Their collection is built to serve patrons from infant to adult ages, multiple cognitive abilities and education levels, cultural interests and depending on the community language preferences. It is often understood that public librarians are the saints of the library world as the stresses they undergo working in public libraries is greater than those in academic or special libraries.

Academic Libraries

Academic libraries are libraries found at any institution providing postsecondary education including universities, four-year colleges, community and junior colleges. The academic library function and purpose is directly related to the institution with which the library is embedded, this means their mission is directly proportional to the mission of the parent institution. The primary purpose of an academic library is to serve students and faculty. Academic libraries may provide limited service to local community, however it is not uncommon for academic libraries to not offer the community circulation privileges.

An academic library’s collection is built primarily of research resources based upon the programs the institution it serves offers and is more focused than that of a public library. “The type and sophistication of materials in the collection reflect the mission of the particular institution, generally either teaching or research” (Rubin, 2010, p200). If the institution offers courses in computer programming the library is expected to provide resources to help these students succeed in the respected program.

School Libraries/ Multi-Media Centers

School libraries, often referred to as multi-media centers, are usually located within a school system that serves students from kindergarten thru twelfth grade. Similar to academic libraries, because school libraries are embedded within a school system the school board’s policies ultimately govern their activities. The Association of School Librarians (AASL) describes the mission of school libraries as:

To ensure that the students and staff are effective users of ideas and information. The school library media specialist (SLMS) empowers students to be critical thinkers, enthusiastic readers, skillful researchers, and ethical users of information. (AASL 2009a)

School libraries face many challenges including: achieving the mission of the school, keeping up with new technology as budgets shrink, increased vocal awareness of censorship, and a diminishing workforce. School libraries are likely children’s first interaction with a library independently, meaning without mom or dad providing personal one-on-one guidance.

Special Libraries

Special libraries encompass the libraries that do not fit into the academic or public realm including medial libraries, law libraries, media centers and any information organization “sponsored by private companies, governmental agencies, not-for-profit organizations or professional associations” (Mount 1995 cited within Rubin, 2010, p211). Special libraries exist for librarians to serve a client. In academic and public libraries librarians assist patrons in finding information however in special libraries it is expected that the librarian find the information and resources for the patron or client. The collections in special libraries are usually highly specialized and relatively small in size. Access to these collections are often restricted to a small set of users and are not open to the general public.

Component 2: Justification of Evidence and Evidence:

My first piece of evidence I have chosen to include for this competency is my [Resume]. I selected this piece to show my understanding and experience working in multiple library organizations. I selected my resume as evidence showing that I worked in multiple library settings but I will discuss in my justification here how I understand these organizations and what I have learned from them.

All organization work I discuss here takes place in the library setting only. I have worked for three academic organizations (Von Canon Library at Southern Virginia University, Learning Resource Center at West Coast Ultrasound Institute and University Libraries at the University of California, Riverside) and one public organization (Santa Clara County public library district). Each organization gave me different insight and perspective on how the priorities of these organizations differ.

My experience with a public library focused primarily on social media use where I gained a greater understanding of the general makeup of the patrons they served. One thing I found that was very different from the academic libraries was the stress that was put on handling sensitive posts on social media. The public library district I worked for had a strict policy with handling censorship issues, even if vulgar language was used. Under no circumstance was the post/comment to be hidden or removed. If it contained sensitive content it was to be reported to the Virtual Library manager who then would take it to the district library board to decide on how to handle the situation. Also, how the social media tools were used to connect with patrons and the focus that was engaged varied from the academic setting. In the public library, the library focused on patron leisure interests and advertising new programs and services. In my experience, the academic libraries focused also on programs and services but published more scholarly and research information for patrons.

While working at the University of California, Riverside (UCR), one thing that I noticed was the patron count was not as important. All current and registered students were automatically patrons so out reach to the community for upping the patron count was not a major priority like it is in public libraries. Public libraries used patron usage as backing to show their merit to the community. Instead the priority was collection usage and resource selection since this is primary to show backing for academic libraries. UCR however is a public institution so their resources were available to the public but certain privileges were denied them unless they became “friends of the library” and paid a fee.

One of the academic libraries I worked in was for a medical school that focused on digital imaging (ultrasounds, echocardiograms, and MRI) although this was an academic setting it mirrored many of the aspects of a special library such as specialized and small collection size and limited access to only faculty and students attending the school, it was not open to public access at all. Also, the development of this collection was primarily built on the requests of the faculty and less from budget allocations which meant any requests from faculty were fulfilled.

My second piece of evidence I have chosen to include for this competency is an [Interview with a Librarian] that I completed for Libr210. I interviewed a reference librarian in an academic institution. This interview provides information on collection development and maintenance in an academic library. I chose this piece to show the knowledge I gained about academic librarians and the types of tasks, issues and concerns they deal with in that environment. For example, specific to budgets and collection development, in an academic library they need to decide on the allotted budget for each department and specialty subjects based on university curriculum. This can be allocated equally across the board, but often core subjects will receive more funds than elective subjects.

My final piece of evidence I have chosen to include is a [SMS Reference_Final Proposal] I worked with my team on in Libr246. The proposal is to implement using Google Voice as a SMS reference service in a public library. I chose to include this because in our research for this project we studied other libraries and what they used for SMS reference, the community they served, what worked for them and why it worked, and roadblocks they encountered in the process. This research gave us insight on public libraries and the focus these types of organizations take when reaching out to their communities. I also learned how roadblocks were addressed or how the library decided on keeping or discontinuing a service similar to the one we were proposing on implementing.

Conclusion:

Through my experience and evidence I have shown my understanding of the varying environments that I can work in as an information professional. It is important to know the patrons you are serving, the issues at large with the organization including funding concerns, the mission and focus of the library and collection development. Although there are some issues that affect all libraries such as funding, the tactics in addressing these issues will vary due to the type of library. The same goes with public access and community outreach. A special library will not put forth the same amount of effort and funds for community outreach as a public library because their mission and the patrons they serve often do not include public access. Understanding these environments will help prepare me should I work in any one of them.

References:

American Association of School Librarians. Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs. Chicago: American Association of School Librarians, 2009.

Rubin, R. E. (2010). The Values and Ethics of Library and Information Science. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc.

Evidence:

Resume

Interview with a Librarian

SMS Reference_Final Proposal