Getting your color on: maybe there’s some truth to the trend

Post originally published on LITA Blog http://litablog.org/2016/05/getting-your-color-on-maybe-theres-some-truth-to-the-trend/


FullSizeRender

Coloring was never my thing, even as a young child, the amount of decision required in coloring was actually stressful to me. Hence my skepticism of this zen adult coloring trend. I purchased a book and selected coloring tools about a year ago, coloring bits and pieces here and there but not really getting it. Until now.

While reading an article about the psychology behind adult coloring, I found this quote to be exceptionally interesting:

The action involves both logic, by which we color forms, and creativity, when mixing and matching colors. This incorporates the areas of the cerebral cortex involved in vision and fine motor skills [coordination necessary to make small, precise movements]. The relaxation that it provides lowers the activity of the amygdala, a basic part of our brain involved in controlling emotion that is affected by stress. -Gloria Martinez Ayala [quoted in Coloring Isn’t Just For Kids. It Can Actually Help Adults Combat Stress]

Color Me Stress Free by Lacy Mucklow and Angela Porter

A page, colored by Whitni Watkins, from Color Me Stress Free by Lacy Mucklow and Angela Porter

As I was coloring this particular piece [pictured to the left] I started seeing the connection the micro process of coloring has to the macro process of managing a library and/or team building. Each coloring piece has individual parts that contribute to forming the outline of full work of art. But it goes deeper than that.

For exampled, how you color and organize the individual parts can determine how beautiful or harmonious the picture can be. You have so many different color options to choose from, to incorporate into your picture, some will work better than others. For example, did you know in color theory, orange and blue is a perfect color combination? According to color theory, harmonious color combinations use any two colors opposite each other on the color wheel.” [7]  But that the combination of orange, blue and yellow is not very harmonious?

Our lack of knowledge is a significant hindrance for creating greatness, knowing your options while coloring is incredibly important. Your color selection will determine what experience one has when viewing the picture. Bland, chaotic or pleasing, each part working together, contributing to the bigger picture. “Observing the effects colors have on each other is the starting point for understanding the relativity of color. The relationship of values, saturations and the warmth or coolness of respective hues can cause noticeable differences in our perception of color.” [6]  Color combinations, that may seem unfitting to you, may actually compliment each other.  

Note that some colors will be used more frequently and have a greater presence in the final product due to the qualities that color holds but remember that even the parts that only have a small presence are crucial to bringing the picture together in the end. 

“Be sure to include those who are usually left out of such acknowledgments, such as the receptionist who handled the flood of calls after a successful public relations effort or the information- technology people who installed the complex software you used.”[2]

There may be other times where you don’t use a certain color as much as it should have and could have been used. The picture ends up fully colored and completed but not nearly as beautiful (harmonious) as it could have been. When in the coloring process, ask yourself often “‘What else do we need to consider here?’ you allow perspectives not yet considered to be put on the table and evaluated.” [2] Constant evaluation of your process will lead to a better final piece.

While coloring I also noticed that I color individual portions in a similar manner. I color triangles and squares by outlining and shading inwards. I color circular shapes in a circular motion and shading outwards. While coloring, we find our way to be the most efficient but contained (within the lines) while simultaneously coordinating well with the other parts. Important to note, that the way you found to be efficient in one area  may not work in another area and you need to adapt and be flexible and willing to try other ways. Imagine coloring a circle the way you color a square or a triangle. You can take as many shortcuts as you want to get the job done faster but you may regret them in the end. Cut carefully. 

Remember while coloring: Be flexible. Be adaptable. Be imperturbable.

You can color how ever you see fit. You can choose which colors you want, the project will get done. You can be sure there will be moments of chaos, there will be moments that lack innovation. Experiment, try new things and the more you color the better you’ll get. However, coloring isn’t for everyone, at that’s okay. 

Now, go back and read again, this time substitute the word color for manage.

Maybe there is something to be said about this trend of the adult coloring book. 


References:
1. Coloring Isn’t Just For Kids. It Can Actually Help Adults Combat Stress http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/13/coloring-for-stress_n_5975832.html
2. Twelve Ways to Build an Effective Team http://people.rice.edu/uploadedFiles/People/TEAMS/Twelve%20Ways%20to%20Build%20an%20Effective%20Team.pdf
3. COLOURlovers: History Of The Color Wheel http://www.colourlovers.com/blog/2008/05/08/history-of-the-color-wheel
4. Smashing Magazine: Color Theory for Designers, Part 1: The Meaning of Color: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/01/color-theory-for-designers-part-1-the-meaning-of-color/
5. Some Color History http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/vision/colhist.html
6. Color Matters: Basic Color Theory http://www.colormatters.com/color-and-design/basic-color-theory
7. lifehacker: Learn the Basics of Color Theory to Know What Looks Good http://lifehacker.com/learn-the-basics-of-color-theory-to-know-what-looks-goo-1608972072
8. lifehacker: Color Psychology Chart http://lifehacker.com/5991303/pick-the-right-color-for-design-or-decorating-with-this-color-psychology-chart
9. Why Flexible and Adaptive Leadership is Essential http://challenge2050.ifas.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/YuklMashud.2010.AdaptiveLeadership.pdf

Update to the Problem: we have a solution

So a few months ago there was a problem Where I continue to admire the Problem without a complete Solution. This has been solved for a few months, but sh!t happens. Am now finally getting around to providing the a solution, one that works for me, but may not work for you. This is pieced together haphazardly, mainly so I have note of it and well so if you’re looking for help on doing something similar you have a much better starting point than I did.

After a hot minute with Python-LDAP I determined it was a beast I was not interested in taming at the moment because well I had another option, mind you at the time we thought this ‘other’ option was going to be easier. I don’t know if it was or not, but it took some serious neuron firing to do.

At one point I dove deep into VBA scripting, where I figuratively lost loads of hair and age 20 years. The script scraped hundreds of emails for a text string (unique ID), to parse out into an excel file (staying within the suite of Microsoft Office deemed significantly easier than going out) and then ran line by line on LDAP to print the output of the request attributes and then convert to csv and email to colleague to do a mail merge.

**confession** I actually signed up for a Stack Overflow account because of this!

One Solution but not THE solution:

VBScript and a Bash script that ran LDAP Queries, Python conversions and used Mutt to send an email attachment.
I’ve changed values to neutral values, you will need to update them to match what you need.
Here is my repo that provides the files you’ll need if you decide to take the VBScript route. https://github.com/whitni/VBScriptandLDAP

Once you set this up in VBA, you can set it as a macro, but I had it set as a rule at first and then switched to doing something different right after I had this solution in place…so didn’t bother.

The Solution I settled on:

I returned to a single bash script that queried LDAP matching on certain attributes, primary change was the decision to send emails out based on start dates and not when we received an email notification from HR. This will soon be turned into a cron job and I can dust my hands of it BUT walking away with significantly more knowledge of LDAP, AD, VBA and all that…

#!/bin/bash
#A simple script

## date format ##
today=$(date +”%F”)
startdate=$(date +”%Y%m”)

##backup path ##
BAK=”/path/that/you/saved/file/newhires_$today”

# LDAP Search query
ldapsearch -W -h your.AD.server.com -x -D ldapusername@email.com -b “dc=$1,dc=$2,dc=$3” -s sub “attributes you need to match or not match on” attributes you want > $BAK

#convert LDIF to csv
python LDIFtoCSV/LDIFtoCSV.py $BAK > /path/that/you/saved/file/newhires_$today.csv

#send email with file attached
mutt -a /path/that/you/saved/file/newhires_$today.csv -s “New Hire Emails” -c persontoCC@email.com — persontoemail@email.com

Resources used:
VBScript Library: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa227499(v=vs.60).aspx
RegEx parsing: http://www.slipstick.com/developer/regex-parse-message-text/
LDAP Man page: [Linux_terminal] > man ldap
LDIFtoCSV conversion tool: https://github.com/tachang/ldiftocsv
Stack Overflow — my question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/36752876/why-does-copying-a-string-from-outlook-to-excel-open-a-new-instance-of-excel-for/36754211#36754211

An Open Letter to the #c4l16 Program Committee

Thank you.

As I’ve begun the processing period of what a Code4Lib conference does to you, there has been but one thing that has remained the same, working with you all has been one of my best conference experiences. All the hours spent in analyzing proposals, drafting up many many potential programs setups, it was worth it.

Thank you for the support and willingness to try something new. I’ve been on a few conference committees and none of them, have made it feel like we could try something new, until now. Ideas were not shot down, they were taken into consideration. As an outsider looking in, this is a place where if I’m going to put in large quantities of energy, it would not be wasted. I’d willingly do it again.

Thank you for providing a space where I felt less intimidated to say something. For a space where, if I did decide to say something, you were listening to understand and not to respond. As someone who felt like they didn’t belong at Code4Lib — you’ve helped me find my place.

We tried something new, we did not fail, and in fact in my eyes we succeeded. The program was strong and broad reaching. This was something we wanted to happen and worried (given our excitement when the panel came together) that maybe we were overreaching, but what matters most is that we were given the power to try – that says something about the Code4Lib community in general. Thank you to those who helped in paving the pathway so we could do this.

I want to apologize for my falling short on delivering the lightning talk we all envisioned, but thank you for making it an opportunity to be delivered. For standing behind me, in person and by live stream, so I wasn’t up there alone. Thank you for the constant encouragement.

It’s been an honor to be a part of this but most importantly, it’s been a pleasure. Hard work is less hard when you’re on a supportive team and a team that carries the burden together. Because of my experience working with you all this year, you’ve secured my buy in to Code4Lib, for this I am grateful. Thank you for restoring my faith that we can actually be the change we want to see in an organization.

Sincerely,
Me, a very lucky volunteer.

PS Thank you Ben for the extra nudge to join the committee & for putting my name on the list and for your constant encouragement to speak up.

I’m a Librarian. Of tech, not books.

Post originally published on LITA Blog: http://litablog.org/2016/02/im-a-librarian-of-tech-not-books/


When someone finds out I’m a librarian, they automatically think I know everything there is to know about, well, books. The thing is, I don’t. I got into libraries because of the technology. My career in libraries started with the take off, a supposed library replacement, of ebooks. Factor in the Google “scare” and librar*s  were going to be done forever. Librar*s were frantic to debunk that they were no longer going to be useful, insert perfect time and opportunity to join libraries and technology.

I am a Systems Librarian and the most common and loaded question I get from non-librarians is (in 2 parts), “What does that mean? and What do you do?” Usually this resorts to a very simple response:
I maintain the system the library sits on, the one that gives you access to the collection from your computer in the comfort of your home. This tool, that lets you view the collection online and borrow books and access databases and all sorts of resources from your pajamas, my job is to make sure that keeps running the way we need it to so you have the access you want.
My response aims to give a physical picture about a technical thing. There is so much we do as systems librarians that if I were to get in-deep with what I do, we’d be there for a while. Between you and I, I don’t care to talk *that* much, but maybe I should.

There’s a lot more to being a Systems Librarian, much of which is unspoken and you don’t know about it until you’re in the throws of being a systems librarian. There was a Twitter conversation prompted when a Twitter’er asked for recommendations on things to teach or include in on the job training for someone who is interested in library systems. It got me thinking, because I knew little to nothing about being a Systems Librarian and just happened upon it (Systems Librarianship) because the job description sounded really interesting and I was already a little bit qualified. It also allowed me to build a skill set that provided me a gateway out of libraries if and when the time arrived. Looking back, I wonder what would I have wanted to know before going into Systems, and most importantly, would it have changed my decision to do so, or rather, to stay? So what is it to be a Systems Librarian?

The unique breed: A Systems Librarian:

  • makes sure users can virtually access a comprehensive list of the library’s collection
  • makes sure library staff can continue to maintain that ever-growing collection
  • makes sure that when things in the library system break, everything possible is done to repair it
  • needs to be able to accurately assess the problem presented by the frantic library staff member that cannot log into their ILS account
  • needs to be approachable while still being the person that may often say no
  • is an imperfect person that maintains an imperfect system so that multiple departments doing multiple tasks can do their daily work.
  • must combine the principles of librarianship with the abilities of computing technology
  • must be able to communicate the concerns and needs of the library to IT and communicate the concerns and needs of IT to the library

Things I would have wanted to know about Systems Librarianship: When you’re interested but naive about what it takes.

  • You need to be able to see the big and small pictures at once and how every piece fits into the puzzle
  • Systems Librarianship requires you to communicate, often and on difficult to explain topics. Take time to master this. You will be doing a lot of it and you want everyone involved to understand, because all parties will most likely be affected by the decision.
  • You don’t actually get to sit behind a computer all day every day just doing your thing.
  • You are the person to bridge the gap between IT and librarians. Take the time to understand the inner workings of both groups, especially as they relate to the library.
  • You’ll be expected to communicate between IT staff and Library staff why their request, no matter the intention, will or will not work AND if it will work, but would make things worse – why.
  • You will have a new problem to tackle almost every day. This is what makes the job so great
  • You need to understand the tasks of every department in the library. Take the time to get to know the staff of those departments as well – it will give insight to how people work.
  • You need to be able to say no to a request that should not or cannot be done, yes even to administration.
  • No one really knows all you do, so it’s important to take the time to explain your process when the time calls for it.
  • You’ll most likely inherit a system setup that is confusing at best. It’s your job to keep it going, make it better even.
  • You’ll be expected to make the “magic” happen, so you’ll need to be able to explain why things take time and don’t appear like a rabbit out of a hat.
  • You’ll benefit greatly from being open about how the system works and how one department’s requests can dramatically, or not so dramatically, affect another part of the system.
  • Be honest when you give timelines. If you think the job will take 2 weeks, give yourself 3.
  • You will spend a lot of time working with vendors. Don’t take their word for  “it,” whatever “it” happens to be.
  • This is important– you’re not alone. Ask questions on the email lists, chat groups, Twitter, etc..
  • You will be tempted to work on that problem after work, schedule time after work to work on it but do not let it take over your life, make sure you find your home/work life balance.

Being a systems librarian is hard work. It’s not always an appreciated job but it’s necessary and in the end, knowing everything I do,  I’d choose it again. Being a tech librarian is awesome and you don’t have to know everything about books to be good at it. I finally accepted this after months of ridicule from my trivia team for “failing” at librarianship because I didn’t know the answer to that obscure book reference from an author 65 years ago.

Also, those lists are not, by any means, complete — I’m curious, what would you add?


Possibly of interest, a bit dated (2011) but a comprehensive list of posts on systems librarianship: https://librarianmandikaye.wordpress.com/systems-librarian/

Where I continue to admire the Problem without a complete Solution.

Hi — it’s me again. It’s been a while because I’ve been “stuck” on what I have wanted to populate this space with. I’ve decided on for now as a loud thinking space for problems I am working on at work because writing it out helps.

A problem I run into on a daily basis is knowing what I want to accomplish, the steps to accomplish it but now knowing how to piece it together. This is where I think that fundamental training (have you) in computer science would help. I have all the pieces but I don’t have the glue. Yet. I’m learning what I need to do to solve this but there’s little structure to it, because it’s all in the moment. See also why sometimes the formal education can be helpful.

Current problem I am trying to solve: we send out new hire emails and currently that’s done manually, meaning we receive an email notice with bits of information on a new employee/intern/etc (but not their email because it may or may not have been created at the time the notice was sent). We retain X, Y, Z of that information, put it in an excel spreadsheet and then manually look the person up in our internal directory for their email (if it exists) and drop that into the excel sheet & then do a mail merge on an email template (with a sizable amount of links).

This is a LOAD of work and there is a large back log that exists and to do that manually would be 100% inefficient, expensive & a waste of time.

Current solution I have: Run an ldapsearch query for exchange accounts created equal to or greater than a certain date & are not test/dummy accounts and print the X, Y, and Z variables for all of those accounts. Then convert that data from LDIF to .csv and save to a file on the server, which I can then drop the file into local shared drive (OR send email w/ attached file) where person who does mail merge can then take the csv file and run the mail merge. Goal is to automate the mail merge in the sense of once the file is created, have a job that checks “modified date” when that changes automatically send email and then have a VB Script that can be ran to check for certain emails (this is where instead of email attachment, might be better to have the file in the local drive) or check the local shared drive folder for this file & run the mail merge on it to send the emails.

New problem I have *no* idea how to glue all of this together so it can be executed and ran from a single command. I have the ldapsearch query, I know how to print the output, I have the Perl script to convert the data from LDIF to csv, I know how to email the output file (as an attachment), I don’t have the script all the way together for the mail merge yet because I’d like to focus on and solve the first problem of getting the data because you can forget about the mail merge if you don’t have the data.

Solution? I don’t have one yet.

**UPDATE**
To say I have no idea how to glue all of this together is not completely accurate. I know I want to write a bash script because I can run all of these pieces from the command line, that was purposeful. I know that I will want to use the python-LDAP API. I know that I can (will?) use perl for the data format conversion. I know that I want to automate the emailing of the output file as a cron job. What I don’t know. Yet. is the syntax of gluing these together so that they run seamlessly from minimal effort on my part (in the end).

Resources:
Python-LDAP Applications (using the python-LDAP API) [part 1] [part 2] [part 3] [part 4]

Blanket Statements [written in frustration]

I really struggle with blanket statements, statements that imply your frustration of one person apply to a large group, or even not large group of people.

Recently there was a post written on the LITA Blog that discussed stereotypes about men and librarianship and if technology is bringing more skillful men into the field. The post has not been well received, for justified reasons. I too am scratching my head at the topic of choice and lack of research done in the piece.

Something to keep in mind is that saying things that imply your disgust in a blog post applies to every person that writes for that blog is a bit harsh. Implying that the organization as a whole is not worth your time if they let something like this get posted.  There have been several really great pieces written by members of the LITA blog team that have NO association with the current post (http://litablog.org/2015/10/is-technology-bringing-in-more-skillful-male-librarians/). Yes we are a team but we don’t all have the same views, we don’t all agree on the same thing, but we do all write for LITA Blog and we choose our topics. Topics are NOT assigned to us, we have the guideline to write about libraries and information technology.

Yes, I am a LITA Blog writer. Which is why these blanket statements are taken personally because the generalization that the entire blog writing team is bringing shame to the profession is harsh. Maybe instead you should provide productive criticism or comment on the blog post so the author gets to hear directly that the piece ruffled your feathers & why. Instead of making a blanketed statement, and discrediting (whether intended or not) the work and writing of others.

As I write this I’m frustrated, and I think rightfully so, as a LITA Blog writer, I’m not thrilled that a fellow writer wrote what they wrote, but it’s their topic, something they felt they wanted to write about. I do not have to agree with it, but I think I can disagree with it with respect.

I ask, in the defense of the talented team I write with, that you don’t discredit the entire blog based on one post that really pissed you off. We all see this world with a different perspective, remember that and even though I disagree/dislike the view given in this specific post, if I want different ideas to be presented, then I have the opportunity as a LITA Blog writer to do that.

If you want something to change then you must be proactive for its change. Tossing it to the side like it’s not worth your time, what good does that do? Work towards making things better. We have that ability.

**UPDATE**
A fantastic response to the post being mentioned by Galen Charlton, https://galencharlton.com/blog/2015/10/books-and-articles-thud-so-nicely-a-response-to-a-lazy-post-about-gender-in-library-technology/

LITA Forum, 2014: My Recap

Last week (Nov. 4-8, 2014)  I attended the LITA (Library and Information Technology Association) Forum in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This was my first LITA anything that I had been a part of and had no expectations beyond those of myself in networking and learning. There were so many fantastic sessions to choose from it was really difficult to choose and thanks to the incredible use of Twitter, I was able to get snips of what was going on in the sessions I couldn’t attend.

I was volunteering with the 2014 planning committee to help out at the conference and showed up a day early to help with the pre-conference sessions. Can I recommend that if you go to a conference, volunteer. Especially if this is your first time at said conference. It open the doors to a lot of opportunity for me and I was able to meet and do many things I would not have if I wasn’t volunteering. Showing up early turned out to be in my benefit because there wasn’t much for me to do besides monitoring the pre-conference sessions so I took advantage of the time to visit of some local attractions in Old Town Albuquerque, specifically the Natural History Museum of New Mexico.

Having some down time prior to the conference was wonderful and I highly recommend to designate downtime either before or after the conference. My reasoning for this is that the conference becomes more than just sessions and lots of people learning/speaking about for the most part very similar topics. It gives you an opportunity to experience life outside of the conference venue, in this case the hotel.

I used Twitter for a substantial amount of note taking for multiple reasons: Sharing session snips with those who couldn’t make it and so that I could refer to it later easily. I have put any embedded tweets in [ ] as I refer to them throughout my recap.

**My recap includes only a few of the sessions I attended. As I gather my thoughts on the rest of them I will add them in along with more resources.**

Feel free to read them here: 

My primary focus going into the conference was to attend as many sessions on institutional repositories (IRs) that I could, learn how they are being used and what other libraries are using. My current place of employment is actively researching IRs as we are on the cusp of moving from our current option, ContentDM, to something that will better suit our needs. Choosing an IR has become increasingly more challenging as OpenAccess and data, where’s our data & what does it say, are major factors in what you need to and want to accomplish with your IR. How it is used, presented, accessed and managed can change what software you go with.

Goal: Learn what others are doing with their IRs.

Achieved: Margaret Heller’s session on “What Does Your Repository Do?: Understanding and Calculating Impact” showed me how Loyola University Chicago’s IR is being used. [PDF]

Margaret’s presentation was super interesting as it took Loyola’s IR and showed how it was being used. The content in the IR is accessible all over the world and when Loyola looked at the data of their IR it showed countries that they never would have thought would have interest or be accessing the content.

The story of why: limited access to resources at their library/institution or lack of resources on that specific topic.

MH_LITA

Having the story beyond the numbers really stuck with me; if done right an IR can serve people you never thought would be accessing your content. [Are the traffic drivers of IRs aligning with the institution’s goal/mission? #litaforum Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

This session more or less reconfirmed the importance of having and IR and the OpenAccess movement.

Resources Gained:

Real-Time readership map from LUC: http://ecommons.luc.edu/readership_map.html#content

Goal: Learn/Discuss an IR in action and resources used.

Achieved: Tommy Keswick’s session on “Using Islandora for Digital Content Delivery” discussed and showed Detroit Public Library using Islandora . [Check out an #Islandora repo from Detroit Public Library. http://t.co/oYgI4up5nF #LITAforum Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

Tommy and I had talked about Islandora a couple of months back at a meet-up in L.A.; prior to my move to New York and prior to my immediate interest in implementing an IR. Islandora is on MPOW’s list of IRs to look at, primary reason our entire site is on Drupal. Islandora is a Drupal, Fedora & Solr developed DAMS (Digital Asset Management System). Why use a DAMS and not just a CMS? A DAMS like Islandora offers standards for metadata, integrity tools and extensibility. A major drawback I have with many IRs is the presentation of the content is never “sock blowing” awesome. No, Islandora isn’t sock blowing but it is definitely a major step closer.

Resources Gained:

Git Repo for Entity Bridge [Cherry Hill devs figured out a way to utilize the flag ability from Drupal with Islandora, Entity Bridge :https://t.co/xGsJejbFpz #litaforum — Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

Solution for Indexing [A solution for tricky indexing create a catch all field(s). Use them to search whole words & to search partial words. #islandora #litaforum — Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

Git Repo for JQuery Zoom [View GitHub repo for JQuery Zoom https://t.co/rwkKHq2Yln #islandora #litaforum — Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

Goal: Be inspired. Achieved: Keynote sessions #1 and #2 (I missed #3 due to flight conflict).

AnnMarie Thomas: Playing to Learn: A Maker’s Perspective. Obviously, her entire keynote was about being a maker. It was by far my favorite point of the entire conference. “It doesn’t feel like work if you’re laughing” so often we get stuck in the “work no play” aspect that we forego opportunities to learn. Her keynote session resonated with me. As a newly dubbed librarian over two departments that are recovering from a stressful reorganization, this session gave me the humph to encourage play at work.

[After being inspired by @amptMN keynote at #litaforum I put out a puzzle this AM & my dept enjoyed the fun. #MAKERS pic.twitter.com/kxb4ludDm4 Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 11, 2014]

Lorcan Dempsey: VP at OCLC. He spoke about Thinking about Technology Differently. “The network reshapes the society and the society reshapes the network.”

 

infovsknowledge by the GapingVoid

We have a lot of text. A lot of records and what we want to do with it is turn it into a form that is more usable. That will yield more insight, more knowledge.

 

We want to make a qualitative difference with the quantity of data/information that we have. I enjoyed this keynote because working in libraries and in library systems, surrounded by information and technology. How I think about it and know it’s use and how it ties together is not how someone else may think about it. Lorcan boldly said, and I agree, “Technology is integrated. It isn’t something you pick up and move over. It is implied and incorporated.”

We have moved from caring just about the outcome to caring significantly about the method. We want to know the how not just the what. Libraries are working constantly with learning behaviors and research behaviors, we see software that has been created to manage the data to tell us more than the what.

You can view the entire keynote session here LITA Forum 2014 Lorcan Dempsey [70min]

Goal: Network and meet others. 

Achieved:

Volunteering: My reasons for volunteering were both monetary benefit and personal networking gain. As I mentioned I had never been to a LITA forum before. I had interacted with a handful of other attendees via Twitter but didn’t know anyone in person. Volunteering gave me a ground to start running. I recorded keynote sessions (gave me a front row seat, WIN!), introduced conference sessions and worked with the planning committee and met up and coming committee members.

Game Night: Cards Against Humanities! [You’re missing out. Come join us! #LITAforum pic.twitter.com/EiadiwR4JB Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

OpenRefine Skill-share: The last night of the conference there were networking dinners to sign up for. A couple of us had tweeted interest in playing around with OpenRefine so instead of doing a networking dinner; I took the initiative to do a sign up for playing with OpenRefine. We ended up with a decent response and had some fun. [@cm_harlow @ranti @lorcanD Say what?!  pic.twitter.com/cK5gyif7DM Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 7, 2014]

Unfortunately most of our time, due to dodgy wi-fi, was spent getting installs completed. However, most if not all of those who came left with a bit more knowledge of the program than before and we opened a door of possibility for those who hadn’t any clue as to what OpenRefine could do. [and we’re almost up and running. Installs on multiple OS’s takes time. #litaforum pic.twitter.com/U8rolMh55H Whitni Watkins (@NimbleLibrarian) November 8, 2014]

Overall the conference was great. I learned a lot and was able to come back to MPOW with a stronger knowledge of IRs and a stronger reasoning behind my recommendations.

Things I learned for next year, always volunteer, have a goal in mind prior to going but be willing to change/adjust that goal as you need, pack snacks, take good notes, and don’t cement yourself to session that does not hold any interest to you.

Other Resources from the Conference: